CLOSE YOUR EYES. TAKE A DEEP BREATH. OPEN YOUR HEART.

SHADY DEL KNIGHT, ADMINISTRATOR

SHADY DEL KNIGHT, ADMINISTRATOR
High School Yearbook Photo

"More than a place, the Shady Dell was and will forever remain a state of mind." - Shady Del Knight

"More than a place, the Shady Dell was and will forever remain a state of mind." - Shady Del Knight
HELLO STRANGER ... IT SEEMS LIKE A MIGHTY LONG TIME!

Tuesday, December 6, 2016

Campbell's Classics: Mmm Mmm Good!


She was a little bit country

and a whole lotta rock 'n' roll.


Jo Ann Campbell!

In this 3 part series we're turning back the clock
to the 50s and early 60s. You will meet zesty
singer Jo Ann Campbell and hear some
of her greatest recordings.


For decades the only thing I knew about
sassy songstress Jo Ann Campbell was
her 1962 top 40 hit single "I'm the Girl
From Wolverton Mountain," an answer
to country crooner Claude King's hit
"Wolverton Mountain," which spent
nine weeks at the top of the
country music chart.

"I'm the Girl
From Wolverton Mountain"
(Sept. 1962, highest
chart pos. #38)





I lied. I was also familiar with another
novelty record that became a minor hit
for Jo Ann the following year. "Mother,
Please!" (I'd rather do it myself) was
based on the popular slogan from the
Anacin pain reliever commercials.

"Mother, Please"
(May 1963, highest
chart pos. #88)





When I did some digging I realized that I
had missed a bunch of great recordings
made by this vivacious vocalist from
Jacksonville, Florida.  Let's go back
to the start of Jo Ann's career
and check 'em out.


Jo Ann's debut single, released in 1956
when she was age 18, set the rockin' tone
for many records that followed. "I'm Coming
Home Late Tonight" is an up tempo goody
reminiscent of "Sixty Minute Man," the
hit by Billy Ward's Dominoes
five years earlier.

"I'm Coming Home Late Tonight"
(1956, uncharted B side of 
"Where Ever You Go")




I was thoroughly impressed by the bluesy
authenticity of Jo Ann's follow-up
single, "Come On Baby."


I was surprised to learn that Jo Ann wrote 
the song and did so while still in her teens.


"Come On Baby" was released on break-in
novelty record king Dickie Goodman's
Eldorado label as the B side of a less
than spectacular ballad written by
Goodman. If I had been in charge
I would have picked Jo Ann's
original song as the A side!

"Come On Baby" 
(1957, B side of
"Forever Young")




Jo Ann next signed with Gone Records
and released seven excellent singles,
most of them doublesiders.


Here's a great example. The A side
features a boogie woogie piano intro that 
sounds like the beginning of Little Richard's 
hit "Lucille." I declare, Jo Ann Campbell,
"You're Driving Me Mad!"

"You're Driving Me Mad"
(1958, uncharted)




On the flip side of most up tempo records you
usually find a ballad. Not so on this single.
What you''ll find instead is more of
that pounding piano and a whole
lotta "Rock and Roll Love."

"Rock and Roll Love" 
(1958, uncharted B side of 
"You're Driving Me Mad")





If you've developed a taste for

Campbell's classics... stay tuned.

I'm serving more in parts 2 & 3

and they're mmm mmm good!

Have a Shady day!